Volume 24, Issue 2 (June & July 2021)                   J Arak Uni Med Sci 2021, 24(2): 246-255 | Back to browse issues page


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Zolfaghari S, Moradi O, Ahmadian H, Shams Alizadeh N. The Effects of Teaching Sexual Satisfaction Model on Couple Burnout. J Arak Uni Med Sci 2021; 24 (2) :246-255
URL: http://jams.arakmu.ac.ir/article-1-6297-en.html
1- Department of Counseling, Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj, Iran.
2- Department of Counseling, Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj, Iran. , o.moradi@iausdj.ac.ir
3- Department of Psychology, Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj, Iran.
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1. Introduction
ne of the main factors affecting the quality and stability of a couples’ relationship is sexual satisfaction [1]. In a healthy marriage, having a desirable sexual relationship that can satisfy both parties, plays a critical and fundamental role in the success and stability of the family structure [7]. However, an unsatisfactory marital and sexual relationship can lead to marital burnout in the couple. Marital burnout is a condition that numerous couples encounter in the face of their high expectations of the relationship. This is because they feel they forgive more than they receive or think they have received, and this includes biopsychological exhaustion [8]. Previous studies disregarded exploring the combined effect of these variables as a model on sexual satisfaction and its effect on reducing couple burnout. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of sex satisfaction model training on reducing marital burnout among couples referring to counseling centers.
2. Materials and Methods
The statistical population of the present study included all couples who were referred to counseling centers in Sanandaj City, Iran, in the academic year of 2018-2019. In total, 300 subjects were selected to participate in the sexual satisfaction model training. First, each couple referring to the counseling centers was provided with the Couple Burnout Measure (CBM). Out of 300 individuals, 60 couples who scored high in the CBM and were willing to participate in this research were selected by convenience sampling method and divided into the experimental and control groups (n=30/group).
The sexual satisfaction training program was administered to the experimental group for 8 weeks (one 90-minute session per week for each variable); however, the control group received no intervention. At the end of the last session, a posttest was conducted in both groups. The obtained data were analyzed in SPSS using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). The applied CBM tool has 20 items which include 3 main components of physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and mental exhaustion.
3. Results
The present study findings presented the effects of the sexual satisfaction model training in two descriptive parts and the research hypothesis was tested. The demographic findings are presented in Table 1.


ANCOVA was used to investigate the effects of educational programs on marital burnout. As per Table 2, by controlling the pretest effects, all tests indicated a significant difference between the experimental and control groups respecting at least one of the dependent variables (P=0.001, F=13.118).


The Chi-squared test data was equal to 0.426, suggesting that 0.426% of the difference in the posttest scores of the research variables was due to the effect of the presented educational program. As per Table 3, by controlling the pretest effects, there was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups concerning marital burnout (P=0.001, F=35.51), physical fatigue (P<0.001, F=25.047), emotional exhaustion (P≥0.001, F=39.031), mental exhaustion (P≥0.001, F=35.020). 


The provided training significantly reduced marital burnout, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and mental exhaustion in the test group, compared to the controls. The effects of marital boredom, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and mental exhaustion were equal to 0.42, 0.31, 0.41, and 0.39, respectively (Table 3), suggesting individual differences observed in the posttest scores of marital burnout, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and mental exhaustion were induced by the provided educational program.
4. Discussion and Conclusion 
The current research results suggested that the provided training program reduced marital burnout; therefore, the sexual satisfaction model was effective in reducing marital burnout. The obtained results were consistent with those of Fishing and associates [16]. In other words, marital burnout is characterized by frustration and anger towards the spouse and marital life, seeking the spouse’s weaknesses, a set of unrealistic expectations from the spouse, and that the marital relationship is not as expected [17]. The causes of marital conflicts, such as marital burnout, defects in sexual relations, and marriage may result from various factors, like the lack of sex education. With proper training, these shortcomings can be eliminated and relationships can be improved. Contrarily, some individuals develop disorders, like marital burnout due to insufficient knowledge and improper knowledge about having sex. With the continuation of this process of married life, they face serious complications. Thus, empowering couples to improve sexual satisfaction causes them to accept their differences as an opportunity for growth. Thus, dissatisfaction, frustration, and boredom occur if couples do not address their needs or do not realize each other’s needs concerning each other and reach no positive solution to meet their needs [21]. In general, the obtained findings indicated that the sexual satisfaction model training was effective in reducing marital burnout in couples referring to counseling centers. This training can be used to improve marital relationships. 

Ethical Considerations
Compliance with ethical guidelines

This study was approved by Ethics Committee of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences (Code: IR.MUK.REC.1397.5037). All ethical principles are considered in this article. The participants were informed about the purpose of the research and its implementation stages. They were also assured about the confidentiality of their information and were free to leave the study whenever they wished, and if desired, the research results would be available to them.

Funding
This research did not receive any grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or non-profit sectors. 

Authors' contributions
All authors met standard writing standards based on recommendations from the International Committee of Medical Journal Publishers (ICMJE).

Conflicts of interest
The authors declared no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgements
The authors express their sincere gratitude to the Vice-Chancellor for Research of the Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, as well as to all the participants and their families for their contribution to the current project.


References
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  2. Lavner JA, Karney BR, Bradbury TN. Does couples’ communication predict marital satisfaction, or does marital satisfaction predict communication? J Marriage Fam. 2016; 78(3):680-94. [DOI:10.1111/jomf.12301][PMID][PMCID]
  3. Li T, Fung HH. The dynamic goal theory of marital satisfaction. Rev Gen Psychol. 2011; 15(3):246-54. [DOI:10.1037/a0024694]
  4. Carr D, Freedman VA, Cornman JC, Schwarz N. Happy marriage, happy life? Marital quality and subjective well-being in later life. J Marriage Fam. 2014; 76(5):930-48. [DOI:10.1111/jomf.12133] [PMID][PMCID]
  5. McNulty JK, Wenner CA, Fisher TD. Longitudinal associations among relationship satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, and frequency of sex in early marriage. Arch Sex Behav. 2016; 45(1):85-97. [DOI:10.1007/s10508-014-0444-6] [PMID][PMCID]
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Type of Study: Original Atricle | Subject: General
Received: 2020/04/23 | Accepted: 2021/01/27

References
1. Jackson JB, Miller RB, Oka M, Henry RG. Gender Differences in Marital Satisfaction: A Meta-analysis. J Marriage Fam. 2014;76(1):105-29. [DOI:10.1111/jomf.12077]
2. Lavner JA, Karney BR, Bradbury TN. Does Couples' Communication Predict Marital Satisfaction, or Does Marital Satisfaction Predict Communication? J Marriage Fam. 2016;78(3):680-94. [DOI:10.1111/jomf.12301]
3. Li T, Fung HH. The Dynamic Goal Theory of Marital Satisfaction. Rev Gen Psychol. 2011;15(3):246-54. [DOI:10.1037/a0024694]
4. Carr D, Freedman VA, Cornman JC, Schwarz N. Happy Marriage, Happy Life? Marital Quality and Subjective Well-being in Later Life. J Marriage Fam. 2014;76(5):930-48. [DOI:10.1111/jomf.12133]
5. McNulty JK, Wenner CA, Fisher TD. Longitudinal Associations Among Relationship Satisfaction, Sexual Satisfaction, and Frequency of Sex in Early Marriage. Arch Sex Behav. 2016;45(1):85-97. [DOI:10.1007/s10508-014-0444-6]
6. Bloch L, Haase CM, Levenson RW. Emotion regulation predicts marital satisfaction: More than a wives' tale. Emotion. 2014;14(1):130-44. [DOI:10.1037/a0034272]
7. Van Steenbergen EF, Kluwer ES, Karney BR. Work-family enrichment, work-family conflict, and marital satisfaction: A dyadic analysis. J Occup Health Psychol. 2014;19(2):182-94. [DOI:10.1037/a0036011]
8. Yoo H, Bartle-Haring S, Day RD, Gangamma R. Couple Communication, Emotional and Sexual Intimacy, and Relationship Satisfaction. J Sex Marital Ther. 2014;40(4):275-93. [DOI:10.1080/0092623X.2012.751072]
9. Dew J, Wilcox WB. If Momma Ain't Happy: Explaining Declines in Marital Satisfaction Among New Mothers. J Marriage Fam. 2011;73(1):1-12. [DOI:10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00782.x]
10. Jones KC, Welton SR, Oliver TC, Thoburn JW. Mindfulness, Spousal Attachment, and Marital Satisfaction: A Mediated Model. Fam J. 2011;19(4):357-61. [DOI:10.1177/1066480711417234]
11. Pines AM, Neal MB, Hammer LB, Icekson T. Job Burnout and Couple Burnout in Dual-earner Couples in the Sandwiched Generation. Soc Psychol Q. 2011;74(4):361-86. [DOI:10.1177/0190272511422452]
12. King DB, DeLongis A. When couples disconnect: Rumination and withdrawal as maladaptive responses to everyday stress. J Fam Psychol. 2014;28(4):460-9. [DOI:10.1037/a0037160]
13. Akbari Zarradkhaneh S, attari M. Necessity of Measuring and Reporting Effect Size Measures in Psychological Studies. frooyesh. 2016; 5 (1): 29-46.
14. Pines AM, Neal MB, Hammer LB, Icekson T. Job burnout and couple burnout in dual-earner couples in the sandwiched generation. Social Psychology Quarterly. 2011;74(4):361-86. [DOI:10.1177/0190272511422452]
15. Ghavi F, Jamale S, Mosalanejad L, Mosallanezhad Z. A Study of Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples. Glob J Health Sci. 2015;8(4):158. [DOI:10.5539/gjhs.v8n4p158]
16. Sayadi M, Madani Y. Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy on Marital Commitment and Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples. J Educ Community Health. 2017;4(3):26-37. [DOI:10.21859/jech.4.3.26]
17. Asadi E, Mansour L, Khodabakhshi A, Fathabadi J. The relationship between couple burnout, sexual assertiveness, and sexual dysfunctional beliefs in women with diabetic husbands and comparing them with women with non-diabetic husbands. J Fam Res. 2013;9(3):324-11.
18. Nazari AM. Prediction of marital burnout based on personality traits and sexual intimacy in married woman nurses in selected private hospitals in Tehran. Preventive Care in Nursing & Midwifery Journal. 2016;6(3):59-70.
19. Najafi A. The relationship between personality traits, irrational beliefs and Couple Burnout. International Academic Journal of Social Sciences. 2016;3(1):1-7.
20. Kebritchi A, Mohammadkhani S. The role of marital burnout and early maladaptive schemas in marital satisfaction between young couples. International Journal of Medical Research & Health Sciences. 2016;5(12):239-46.
21. Aydogan D, Kizildag S. Examination of relational resilience with couple burnout and spousal support in families with a disabled child. The Family Journal. 2017;25(4):407-13. [DOI:10.1177/1066480717731215]
22. Sanai B, Davarniya R, Bakhtiari Said B, Shakarami M. The effectiveness of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) on reducing couple burnout and improvement of the quality of life of married women. Armaghane danesh. 2015;20(5):416-32.

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